Resume

The Internet of Things is leading to the transformation of the way a country can organise and reshape itself and its sectors and verticals, within the global context.
The primary areas today are in the organisation of industry and production, of energy use through utilities, of cities and city life becoming smarter and of transport infrastructure and modalities.
In the early stages of this transition, across and between verticals, there is a primordial role to be played by the enabling environment which can only be established through the instruments of regulation and legislation. With such facilitation by government, it becomes possible for all stakeholders to act – from government agencies, research bodies, the private sector and civil bodies, often in public-private partnership.

This study examines in depth the recent past, the animated present and the ambitious future of national IoT plans in industry, utilities, the smart city and transport.

In addition to detailed reviews of national regulation and facilitation, it pays due attention to the innovative actions of research and the private sector.

The countries covered by this study are Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Norway, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, the UK and the USA.

Table des matières

1. Executive Summary
1.1. Analysis by vertical
1.1.1. Industry
1.1.2. Utilities
1.1.3. Transport
1.1.4. Smart cities
1.2. Country by country analysis

2. Methodology

I – Industry

1. Industry: Market description
1.1. The Industrial Internet: Uses of connected objects in industry
1.1.1. A key enabler of the digital transformation strategy
1.1.2. Production optimisation: The smart factory
1.1.3. Selling connected objects: towards servicisation
1.2. Evolutions of the value chain
1.2.1. Transformation of the manufacturing ecosystem
1.2.2. Evolutions of the connectivity value chain

2. Industry: Drivers and barriers
2.1. Drivers
2.1.1. Available technologies are enabling productivity gains
2.1.2. Large investment programmes
2.1.3. Interests in new business models
2.2. Barriers
2.2.1. Lack of standardisation
2.2.2. Safety, security and data breaches concerns
2.2.3. Shift in internal process and lack of skilled workforce
2.2.4. Technology cautious behaviour

3. Industry: National plans
3.1. Synthesis
3.2. National plans
3.2.1. Brazil
3.2.2. China
3.2.3. Europe
3.2.4. France
3.2.5. Germany
3.2.6. India
3.2.7. Italy
3.2.8. Norway
3.2.9. Russia
3.2.10. South Korea
3.2.11. Spain
3.2.12. Turkey
3.2.13. UK
3.2.14. USA

II – Utilities

1. Utilities: Market analysis
1.1. Market description
1.1.1. Smart metering
1.1.2. Smart grid
1.2. EU policies and funding in smart grids
1.3. Infrastructure deployment

2. Utilities: Drivers & barriers
2.1. Drivers
2.1.1. Regulation as driver
2.1.2. The ever-increasing energy demand and the digital age
2.1.3. For a cleaner, greener environment
2.1.4. Consumers to save on their energy bills
2.1.5. Standards and interoperability needed for a mass deployment
2.1.6. Future-proofing to support a long-term objective
2.2. Barriers
2.2.1. Reservations remain over consumer acceptance
2.2.2. …and are hemmed in by business model issue

3. Utilities: National plans
3.1. Summary
3.2. National plans
3.2.1. Brazil
3.2.2. China
3.2.3. France
3.2.4. Germany
3.2.5. India
3.2.6. Italy
3.2.7. Norway
3.2.8. Russia
3.2.9. South Korea
3.2.10. Spain
3.2.11. Turkey
3.2.12. UK
3.2.13. USA

III. Transport

1. Transport: Market description
1.1. Connected cars
1.2. Autonomous cars and ITS

2. Transport: Drivers and barriers
2.1. Drivers
2.1.1. Regulation
2.1.2. Security improvements
2.1.3. 4G/LTE as a technical enabler
2.1.4. Traffic optimisation
2.1.5. Attractive services development
2.2. Barriers
2.2.1. Costs for car manufacturers
2.2.2. User willingness to pay
2.2.3. Regulation regarding distraction and liability
2.2.4. Issues of technology sustainability
2.2.5. Data and systems security

3. Transport: National plans
3.1. Summary
3.2. National plans
3.2.1. Brazil
3.2.2. China
3.2.3. Europe
3.2.4. France
3.2.5. Germany
3.2.6. India
3.2.7. Italy
3.2.8. Norway
3.2.9. Russia
3.2.10. South Korea
3.2.11. Spain
3.2.12. Turkey
3.2.13. UK
3.2.14. USA

IV – Smart Cities

1. Smart cities: Market description
1.1. Smart mobility in the smart city
1.2. Smart environmental services
1.3. Public safety and homeland security

2. Smart cities: Drivers and barriers
2.1. Drivers
2.2. Barriers

3. Smart cities: National plans
3.1. Synthesis
3.2. National plans
3.2.1. Brazil
3.2.2. China
3.2.3. France
3.2.4. Germany
3.2.5. India
3.2.6. Italy
3.2.7. Norway
3.2.8. Russia
3.2.9. South Korea
3.2.10. Spain
3.2.11. Turkey
3.2.12. UK
3.2.13. USA

Table des figures

Table des figures

Tables
Table 1: Summary of the national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 2: Summary of Brazilian national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 3: Summary of the Chinese national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 4: Targets for the IdF priority markets
Table 5: Summary of the French national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 6: Summary of the German national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 7: Expected results of Industria 4.0 in Italy in 2017-2020
Table 8: Summary of the Italian national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 9: Summary of the Norwegian national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 10: Summary of the Russian national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 11: Scope of Korean smart factory policies
Table 12: Summary of the South Korean national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 13: Maximum funding rates for project call on Industria Connectada 4.0
Table 14: Summary of the Spanish national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 15: Summary of the Turkish national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 16: Summary of the UK national initiatives for the industrial Internet
Table 17: Overview of main national initiatives by country
Table 18: Summary of Brazilian national initiatives for smart energy
Table 19: China’s 2020 low-carbon targets in the national energy mix, by NEA
Table 20: Summary of Chinese national initiatives for smart energy
Table 21: Gazpar meter deployment schedule
Table 22: French smart grid projects
Table 23: Summary of French national initiatives for smart energy
Table 24: Summary of German national initiatives for smart energy
Table 25: Smart grid funding for the periods 2014-2017 and 2017-2021
Table 26: Parties involved in smart grid development in India
Table 27: Summary of Indian national initiatives for smart energy
Table 28: Summary of Italian national initiatives for smart energy
Table 29: Summary of Norwegian national initiatives for smart energy
Table 30: EnergyNET NTI projects
Table 31: EnergyNET roadmap
Table 32: Key industrial players involved in the EnergyNET program
Table 33: Summary of Russian national initiatives for smart energy
Table 34: Summary of South Korean national plan for smart energy
Table 35: Summary of Spanish national initiatives for smart energy
Table 36: Summary of Turkish national initiatives for smart energy
Table 37: Summary of British national initiatives for smart energy
Table 38: US smart grid projects parties involved
Table 39: Summary of US national initiatives for smart energy
Table 40: Main applications in automotive industry
Table 41: Typical connected-car services, a description
Table 42: Car maker strategy regarding module implementation (except for electric car)
Table 43: Summary of key elements for telematics development
Table 44: List of main regulations for connected cars
Table 45: Mobile technology specifications
Table 46: Costs and revenues comparison
Table 47: Main features of smart transport system policies of countries under study
Table 48: Chinese smart transport system policies, key elements
Table 49: Key goals of US smart transport system policies
Table 50: Synthesis of Chinese national plans
Table 51: Synthesis of French national plans
Table 52: Synthesis of German national plans
Table 53: Synthesis of Italian national plans
Table 54: Norwegian Government transportation budgets (million NOK)
Table 55: Norwegian national initiatives for smart transport, in summary
Table 56: Russian national initiatives for smart transport, in summary
Table 57: South Korean national initiatives for smart transport, in summary
Table 58: Synthesis of Spanish national plans
Table 59: Turkish Regional initiatives for smart transport, in summary
Table 60: Synthesis of United Kingdom national plans
Table 61: Synthesis of United States national plans
Table 62: Using digital technologies and the IoT for environmental applications
Table 63: Brazilian national initiatives for the smart city, in summary
Table 64: National Plan and Government guidance on the smart city in China
Table 65: Key figures of SMART TOGETHER project
Table 66: Field (Vertical)
Table 67: Indian national initiatives for the smart city, in summary
Table 68: Norwegian national initiatives for the smart city. In summary
Table 69: Consortium of Korean Smart City Project players
Table 70: South Korean national initiatives for the smart city, in summary
Table 71: Spanish smart cities rankings
Table 72: Turkish national initiatives for the smart city, in summary
Table 73: Winners of the 2017 Digital Cities Survey by category

Figures
Figure 1: Main positionings of countries in industry sector
Figure 2: Main positionings of countries in utilities sector
Figure 3: Main positionings of countries in transport sector
Figure 4: Evolution of the urban population over a century
Figure 5: Main positionings of countries in smart city sector
Figure 6: Level of the initiative of each country in each vertical
Figure 7: The IDATE framework for digital transformation
Figure 8: Technologies of the third wave of digital transformation
Figure 9: Smart factory use case
Figure 10: SMILE distribution of value added, by manufacturing activity
Figure 11: Linking smart factory development and reshoring: a survey by Citigroup
Figure 12: Annual investments in Industry 4.0 solutions until end-2020
Figure 13: Comparison of adoption readiness for industrial Internet, USA vs. Germany)
Figure 14: New business models opportunities
Figure 15: Industries that named security as a top challenge in the implementation of big data
Figure 16: Greatest challenges to progress towards Industry 4.0 (survey)
Figure 17: Factories of the Future PPP scope
Figure 18: Geographical coverage of the DIH project
Figure 19: Value added by industry in France
Figure 20: Priority markets for the ‘Industrie du Futur’ initiative
Figure 21: Parties implementing ‘Industrie du Futur’ programme
Figure 22: Share of manufacturing in total value added in European countries
Figure 23: Fields covered with Industrie 4.0. in Germany
Figure 24: 2017 results of Industrie 4.0.
Figure 25: Parties involved in implementation of Industrie 4.0.
Figure 26: SWOT matrix for Industrie 4.0.
Figure 27: Tax incentives offered by the Industria 4.0 National Plan
Figure 28: Structure of the steering committee for Industria 4.0
Figure 29: Level of digitisation and automation manufacturing
Figure 30: Industry 4.0 readiness of European countries
Figure 31: Industry 4.0 configuration
Figure 32: Manufuture Industry transformation model based on five pillars for innovating enterprises
Figure 33: Breakdown of Russian GDP by economic activity in 2016
Figure 34: Main categories of parties involved in industry digitalisation in Korea
Figure 35: Priorities of the Spanish Industria Connectada 4.0.
Figure 36: Industry 4.0 readiness of European countries
Figure 37: Digital transformation is basis for implementing Industry 4.0
Figure 38: Industry 4.0 vision for Turkey – 2-3% revenue growth expected from Industry 4.0 by 2025
Figure 39: Value added generated by manufacturing sector in the UK in 2016
Figure 40: Geographical distribution of Catapult projects in the UK
Figure 41: Funding sources for HVM Catapult in 2015-2016, in thousand EUR
Figure 42: US industries, by share in total GDP
Figure 43: Layers of data management across the manufacturing ecosystem
Figure 44: Regional Manufacturing Centers of CESMII
Figure 45: SMLC roadmap
Figure 46: How a smart grid works
Figure 47: Smart grid projects moving from R&D to demonstration phases
Figure 48: Investment in projects across Europe, normalised by the electricity consumption of each country
Figure 49: Global energy consumption, 2006 to 2030
Figure 50: IoT Action Plan priorities in Brazil
Figure 51: Layers of opportunities within and beyond the energy industry
Figure 52: Main tasks of China’s Internet Plus Smart Energy Action Plan
Figure 53: Major players of the China Internet Plus Smart Energy Plan
Figure 54: Rollout prospect planning and progress of Linky smart meters
Figure 55: Smart metering structure for Enedis smart electricity metering solution with Linky
Figure 56: Incentive regulation applied to Enedis
Figure 57: Ondeo systems metering infrastructure
Figure 58: Digitalising electricity in Germany
Figure 59: Share of smart meters out of total number of meters installed in Germany
Figure 60: The Siemens smart-grid platform EnergyIP
Figure 61: National Smart Grid Mission by the Indian Ministry of Power
Figure 62: Geography of Indian Smart Grid pilot projects
Figure 63: Second-generation meters from Enel CERVANTES Solutions
Figure 64: Next generation of ‘open’ meters by Enel’s e-distribuzione unit
Figure 65: Enel’s Distribuzione roadmap
Figure 66: Electricity production (left) and distribution (right) market shares in Italy in 2015
Figure 67: Gas production (left) and distribution (right) market shares in Italy in 2015
Figure 68: Enel smart grid system architecture (PLC based)
Figure 69: Kamstrup smart meter
Figure 70: Kamstrup smart meter optional communication module
Figure 71: Demo for Norway smart grids
Figure 72: Russian electric power generation market players
Figure 73: EnergyNET project structure
Figure 74: JEJU Smart Grid Test Bed scheme
Figure 75: Key markets for the year 2020 of the Korean Master Plan for IoT
Figure 76: Smart grid initiative roadmap in South Korea
Figure 77: Energy loss by region
Figure 78: Smart meter and its operating logic
Figure 79: The 21 electricity distribution regions in Turkey
Figure 80: EBSII companies involved in the smart meter rollout in Turkey
Figure 81: SPG companies involved in the smart meter rollout in Turkey
Figure 82: RPG companies involved in the smart meter rollout in Turkey
Figure 83: Landis+Gyr initial product offering
Figure 84: Communication status in a distribution network with smart meter
Figure 85: RPG companies involved in the smart meter rollout in Turkey
Figure 86: Smart metering structure for gas and electricity in the United Kingdom
Figure 87: Quarterly domestic installation activity for large energy suppliers
Figure 88: Domestic meters operated by large energy suppliers as at 31 March 2018
Figure 89: Number of smart and advanced meters installed in smaller non-domestic sites
Figure 90: Savings from deployment of smart grid
Figure 91: US electric power interconnections
Figure 92: Smart meter deployment, by US state, in 2016, % of households
Figure 93: Leading US electric utilities by number of smart meters installed, September 2016
Figure 94: ECall operating principle
Figure 95: Safety elements offered by Hughes Telematics
Figure 96: Monitoring connected charging of Renault Z.E. electric car
Figure 97: Public scepticism towards fully autonomous vehicles
Figure 98: Transport modes of passengers (L) & goods (R) in Brazil, in passenger-kms/tonne-kms
Figure 99: Major tasks for smart transport development in China
Figure 100: The C-V2X Task Force within the IMT-2020 (5G) Promotion Group
Figure 101: Top passenger car producers in the world
Figure 102: eCall operating principle
Figure 103: Ubimobility
Figure 104: Top passenger car producers in the European Union
Figure 105: Example of an initiative in the infrastructure area
Figure 106: Transport modes for passengers (L) & goods (R) in India, in passenger-kms/ tonne-kms
Figure 107: Bestmile project Norway
Figure 108: Norwegian transport policy objectives
Figure 109: Transport of goods (L) and passengers (R) in Russia, by mode, 2015
Figure 110: ERA-GLONASS functioning scheme
Figure 111: Transport modes for goods (L) and passengers (R) in South Korea, in tonne-km; passenger-km
Figure 112: South Korean K-City test bed project for AV scheme
Figure 113: Top passenger car producers in the European Union
Figure 114: Four strategic areas for the ‘Innovation Plan for Transport and Infrastructures 2018-2020’
Figure 115: Example of an initiative related to IoT development in Spain
Figure 116: Sensit system overview
Figure 117: Invipo traffic view for Izmir
Figure 118: UK automotive sector at a glance
Figure 119: Timeline for the development of highly and fully automated vehicles
Figure 120: Evolution of road traffic in the USA, 1960-2012
Figure 121: Top passenger car producers in the world
Figure 122: 70 French smart mobility start-ups
Figure 123: What will be measured by the ‘Array of Things’ initiative in Chicago
Figure 124: How a street lighting network can connect other equipment
Figure 125: Example of a waste collection solution based on fill-level sensors
Figure 126: An air pollution sensor on a street light and a mobile app for data delivery
Figure 127: French video surveillance market
Figure 128: Smart city strategy for Brazil: key components
Figure 129: Key focused areas of smart city development in China
Figure 130: Geographical concentration of pilot smart cities in China
Figure 131: Level of digitalisation in Germany, by sector, in 2016
Figure 132: Smart solutions to be implemented within the Smart City Mission in India
Figure 133: Government agencies responsible for monitoring the Smart City Mission in India
Figure 134: North-South gap of foreign investments in Italy
Figure 135: Intelligent IT concept and characteristics
Figure 136: Location of Spanish smart city initiatives
Figure 137: Structure of the +CITIES project development
Figure 138: Turkish smart city roadmap

Secteur géographique

Afrique & Moyen-Orient Amérique du Nord
  • États-Unis
Asie-Pacifique
  • Chine
  • Corée du Sud
  • Inde
Europe
  • Allemagne
  • Espagne
  • France
  • Italie
  • Norvège
  • Royaume-Uni
  • Turquie
Amérique latine
  • Brésil

Autres détails

  • Référence : M18340MRA
  • Livraison : on the DigiWorld Interactive platform
  • Langues disponibles : Anglais
  • Tags : autonomous cars, Connected Cars, connected objects, energy, industrial Internet, industry, iot, IoT verticals, smart cities, smart grid, smart metering, smart mobility, transport, utilities

Intéressé par cette publication ?

Pour plus d’informations ou pour commander ce produit : Se connecter ou Créer un compte

Pourquoi choisir IDATE DigiWorld ?

  • Leader d’opinion : des experts reconnus aux compétences pluridisciplinaires
  • Support analystes : un support illimité dans le cadre de nos abonnements et des services sur-mesure
  • Plateforme interactive de dernière génération : un accès très simple, rapide et efficace à nos rapports